DIY Faux + Dried Florals Two Ways:
Bouquet + Arrangement

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Bouquet

Here’s what you will need:

Assorted faux and dried blooms, grasses and leaves/branches
Scissors
Wire cutters
Green floral tape
Ribbon - I used a silk scarf instead, but any kind of wide ribbon will work
A tall, wide container to use while combining the florals. I used a wide mouth mason jar, but any vase would do

When selecting your florals, try and choose a combination of blooms on three tiers: Large, open-faced individual stems (I used anthuriums, orchids, poppies and garden roses), groupings of smaller “filler” flowers and leaves (I selected aspen branches, ferns and cosmos) and thin stems of wispy, neutral dried grasses (mine were bunny tails, dried gypsophyillia and neutral, fluffy grass). I also spent a while comparing the colors of each bloom, and the greenery on each bloom to see how they would work together before purchasing.

 
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Left to Right: Garden Roses / Poppies / Orchids, similar here. Tan color no longer available / Anthuriums.

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Left to Right: Ferns, similar available here. / Cosmos spray, similar available here. Brown color no longer available. / Aspen leaf spray, similar available here.

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Start by placing your largest “filler” pieces. I left this aspen branch long because I wanted it to hang low and further out to the side, creating a messier look.

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Next, I added in my second large filler piece, the fern stems. I placed these on the opposite side of the bouquet to the aspen branch, so it can act as a sort of asymmetrical visual balance. These two large filler pieces will help guide me where to fill in my other blooms.

After I had my bulky filler in, I added two garden roses low and in the front. These are large, pretty, open-faced blooms and they’re visually the focal points of the bouquet. I added in two next to each other as a pair, one slightly higher than the other. It’s helpful to add your larger focal point blooms as pairs - It keeps the bouquet from getting too chaotic.

I also added in a poppy stem to start filling in space next to the roses. I like that this poppy stem has a bloom and a bud - the bud adds some variety and helps the bouquet look a little more wild and a little less “perfect.”

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As you’re going, cut your stems according to how high you want them to sit in the bouquet. For my filler branches I wanted them to sit long and low, but for some of my main blooms like the garden roses and orchids, I cut those shorter and stacked them low and in the front.

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Next, I added in individual fern stems, anthurium stems, orchid sprays and groupings of small cosmos flowers between the larger blooms. I tried to make each addition very intentional, and made sure to create very varied lengths and heights in the pieces I was adding. I let the fern stems hang long and low to create a sprawling feel. The orchid spray hangs out and curves down as it is a heavier bloom. I also created some height with a bunch of cosmos flowers, and I tried to let the stems of the small flowers be more naked and wild looking.

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As you’re placing all of your main blooms, add smaller blooms and any remaining leaves/stems as filler. Turn your arrangement around and make sure you’re treating the back the same way as you did the front - try and spread the amount of main blooms and filler out fairly evenly. For example, I did two garden roses, one poppy, and one anthurium on each “side” of my arrangement.

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Finally, add in small bunches of dried gypsophyllia and individual stems of bunny tails and grasses between all of the larger florals. I like to try and create some height with the longer-stemmed grasses - keep them long and just thread them in evenly around the bouquet.

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When you’re done arranging, pull your bouquet out and squeeze it fairly firmly so that none of the stems fall out of place.

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Take your green floral tape and start wrapping it around the base of the bouquet, going up and down. Make sure your wrap several layers so that everything is secure.

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When everything is secure, pinch the tape off and tie a small knot, or stick the tape to itself (it’s slightly grippy).

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Grab your ribbon or scarf and wrap it around the base of the bouquet, covering the tape completely. I used a scarf, so I tied it like a bandage - starting with the small end, then wrapping it around so I could tie both ends together in a knot.

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Make sure the knot is secure, and you’re done!

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Arrangement

Here’s what you will need:

Assorted faux and dried blooms, grasses and leaves/branches
Scissors
Wire cutters
Thin, clear waterproof tape
A metal pin frog
Floral sticky clay. I used regular sticky tack which worked fine because my blooms wouldn’t need water, but if you’re considering using any fresh blooms that you’d need to keep in water, make sure to use waterproof florist-grade sticky clay.
A low, wide bowl or container. I chose one made of glass because I liked being able to see the pin frog and stems, but you can always choose something solid to hide everything.

 
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Left to Right: Garden Roses / Poppies / Orchids, similar here. Tan color no longer available / Anthuriums.

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Left to Right: Ferns, similar available here. / Cosmos spray, similar available here. Brown color no longer available. / Aspen leaf spray, similar available here.

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Take your bowl, pin frog, and sticky tack and use the sticky tack to stick the pin frog to the inside of the bottom of the bowl.

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I used a folded up dish towel as padding to help get the large section of sticky tack stuck onto the bottom of the pin frog securely. The metal pins on pin frog are very sharp, so you don’t want to push it into your surface and damage it.

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Remember to also use padding to protect your hand when pushing your pin frog onto the base of the bowl. In order to get a really good stick, you have to apply quite a bit of pressure. I even stood up and applied all the pressure I could with my hands to really get the sticky tack to adhere the pin frog. You want a really solid stick here so that your heavy blooms and branches don’t weigh the pin frog down in any direction and cause it to become un-stuck.

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Next, create a grid across the top of your bowl using lengths of the thin tape. I first attached parallel lengths going in one direction, about an inch apart, then I crossed back over in the other direction, leaving a gridded top with square openings about an inch in size.

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Once you have your pin frog in and your bowl taped off, start to add in your blooms. To start placing stems, use the metal spiky pins in the pin frog to skewer the base of the stems. This will help them stand upright and “stick” to the bottom of your bowl. For pieces that you would like to have sit lower and longer, try and stick them into the pin frog more on an angle, and let the stem rest in one of the taped openings to support it.

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Start by placing your largest “filler” pieces. I left this aspen branch long because I wanted it to hang low and further out to the side, creating a messier look.

Afloral_ArrangementDIY_018.jpg

Next, I added in my second large filler piece, the fern stems. I placed these on the opposite side of the bouquet to the aspen branch, so it can act as a sort of asymmetrical visual balance. These two large filler pieces will help guide me where to fill in my other blooms.

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After I had my bulky filler in, I added two garden roses low and in the front. These are large, pretty, open-faced blooms and they’re visually the focal points of the bouquet. I added in two next to each other as a pair, one slightly higher than the other. It’s helpful to add your larger focal point blooms as pairs - It keeps the bouquet from getting too chaotic.

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As you’re going, cut your stems according to how high you want them to sit in the bouquet. For my filler branches I wanted them to sit long and low, but for some of my main blooms like the garden roses and orchids, I cut those shorter and stacked them low and in the front.

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Next, I added in individual fern stems, poppies, orchid sprays and groupings of small cosmos flowers between the larger blooms. I tried to make each addition very intentional, and made sure to create very varied lengths and heights in the pieces I was adding. I let the fern stems hang long and low to create a sprawling feel. The orchid spray hangs out and curves down as it is a heavier bloom.

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As you’re placing all of your main blooms, add smaller blooms and any remaining leaves/stems as filler. Turn your arrangement around and make sure you’re treating the back the same way as you did the front - try and spread the amount of main blooms and filler out fairly evenly. For example, I did two garden roses, one poppy, and one anthurium on each “side” of my arrangement.

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Finally, add in small bunches of dried gypsophyllia and individual stems of bunny tails and grasses between all of the larger florals. I like to try and create some height with the longer-stemmed grasses - keep them long and just thread them in evenly around the bouquet.

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Check for any bare spots, or any opportunities for height with some of the longer stems, and turn the arrangement around a few times and look at it. Then you’re done!

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